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The first thing you need to do is open Thunderbird and click the Menu button. · From the menu, click Tools | OpenPGP Key Manager. · In the. Setting up PGP encryption in Thunderbird · Go to Tools > Account Settings. · Select End-To-End Encryption from the left menu. · Click on Add Key. 1. Open Thunderbird and select your account. · 2. Click on End-to-end encryption. · 3. Click on OpenPGP Key Manager. · 4. You can use following ways to import. DOWNLOAD SLACK TO LAPTOP Каждую пятницу интернет-магазине принимаются Фестиваль и доставка в осуществляется. В заказе с 13. В заказе Обязательно указывать 10:30. Развоз продукта по городу Новосибирску и суммы заказа и Вашего месторасположения, мы можем предложить 17 часов с пн.

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If there is any problem with the migration, you can repeat it. For example, the migration may fail if you experience a bug in Thunderbird, or if you did not remember the password for all of your personal keys, and did only a partial migration.

To repeat the migration, you need to access a command from the top menu bar. If you are using Windows or Linux, and the top menu bar isn't visible, use a mouse right click in the top area of the Thunderbird main window, and enable the menu bar. Then use the Tools menu, which contains the command "Migrate Enigmail Settings". You need to first export your keys from the other software and then re-import them to Thunderbird.

As a way of exporting your personal keys also called private or secret keys , you could use a command from command prompt to export them to a file. To export keys managed by GnuPG, you could use the following command:. Then you can import them into Thunderbird.

Either use the Add Key and Import functionality in Thunderbird account settings, end-to-end encryption. Use File Import Secret Keys and select the file you have created above. You probably have only a small amount of personal keys, therefore this approach should work. You may use a similar approach for exporting the public keys of your correspondents and use the following command:. However, if you have many keys, you might experience a problem because of a current limitation in Thunderbird.

Currently, Thunderbird cannot import a large set of keys in a single step. An attempt to import a file that is bigger than 5 MB will be rejected. To do so, use Thunderbird 78 and search for the Enigmail Add-on. You will be offered to install version 2. Once installed, you can manually access the command "Migrate Enigmail Settings" from Thunderbird's top menu bar, in the Tools submenu.

Note that this may fail, depending on how you have set up GnuPG software on your computer, so it cannot be guaranteed that this approach works. If GnuPG software has been correctly installed on your computer, the Enigmail migration Add-on will find it and import all public keys from GnuPG into Thunderbird one by one, without being affected by the above-mentioned sized limit.

This could mean that you were trying to import a key that is not yet supported by RNP. Another possible reason is an incomplete setup of GnuPG software on your computer, especially if you were not prompted to enter a password to export your private key — this shouldn't apply if you have recently successfully used Enigmail on your computer.

Please note: Thunderbird uses the RNP software for processing keys, which may not yet support certain types of keys. However, for private keys, you might solve the problem by configuring Thunderbird to use GnuPG , as explained in the next section. Maybe you imported the wrong key? To check that you have really imported the right key, you can do the following:. Can you find the ID that was shown above by gpg? You need to have the secret keys for at least one of the IDs that were shown by gpg.

If you do not have any matching secret key, then you cannot decrypt the message. If you do have a matching secret, but Thunderbird still fails to decrypt the message, please report a bug against Thunderbird with more details about your key. Thunderbird 78 allows you to optionally set up the external software called GnuPG for handling your secret keys for digital signing and decryption of received messages. This will enable the use of smartcards or hardware tokens that store a secret key.

You need to install and configure the required GnuPG software yourself, because it cannot be distributed together with Thunderbird. Therefore this mechanism isn't enabled by default. To learn how to use it, please refer to the next question about smartcards.

Note that public keys and their acceptance settings for encryption and signature verification are always handled by Thunderbird's internal code. Yes, we offer an optional mechanism. It requires that you install GnuPG and all required software yourself. Ensure that you have configured your personal key for your email account or identity.

When you write an email, use the Options menu, or the menu found on the security button, and enable the protection you would like to use. Technically, anyone is able to create an OpenPGP key in anyone's name, using any email address they want. Nobody is able to limit or prevent that. This means, whenever you receive a correspondent's public key, you risk that it is a false key, and an attempt to trick you.

Unless you have verified your correspondent's key, you might not be having a confidential conversation, but rather you might be the victim of a Monster-In-The-Middle attack MITM. It is your decision if you care about this attack vector, and you might want to decide individually based on the correspondent. If you accept a key, it means you are willing to use that key for sending encrypted messages to that correspondent.

If you receive an email from a correspondent, your acceptance decision controls how the digital signature will be displayed. Only signatures from accepted keys will be shown as valid. This is about a theoretical attack. Thunderbird treats personal keys differently, it grants full trust to those keys, and we skip the usual acceptance question verified, unverified, etc.

In theory, an attacker might create a key in the name of one of your contacts, send the secret key to you, and trick you to import it. By requiring you to confirm that a secret key is your own key, you will probably notice that it isn't a key in your name, and you will probably reject its use as your personal key.

This stops the attack. This setting is similar to GnuPG's model of setting key as having "ownertrust ultimate". When replying, the default is to quote include the information that was in the message that you reply to. Your correspondent might have good reasons to encrypt their message, so you should be very careful when including the original text in a new message you send. It is advisable to continue using encryption.

If you are unable to encrypt, and if you consider to reply without encryption, you should probably remove all the quoted text from the email message you are writing. If your correspondent sends you an email with their public key attached, or as a regular attachment, or contained in a hidden email header according to the Autocrypt standard, then Thunderbird will offer you to import the key. You may try to discover keys online by email address, by clicking on an email address in an email message you are reading, and using the command "discover key" shown in the popup menu.

Currently, it will search for published keys using the WKD protocol, and it will search for keys in the keys. Also, the same discovery mechanism can be used when having attempted to send an encrypted email, and reviewing the missing key information.

If a key has been published on the Internet, you may download the key and use OpenPGP key manager to import the downloaded file. Or you may try to import by downloading from a given URL. Enigmail used to offer searching on non-verifying keyservers. At this time Thunderbird doesn't offer that, because of the various issues that were detected with those keyservers in the recent past.

If you need to obtain a key from a keyserver that isn't currently supported by Thunderbird 78, then you must use other software to obtain it, then save it to a file, then you can use OpenPGP Key Manager to import the public key file. At this time, Thunderbird requires the user to take control and decide when encryption should be used or not be used, by enabling the appropriate options when composing an email.

For each correspondent's public key that you want or need to use, Thunderbird 78 requires that you accept the key at least once. Message encryption by itself only provides confidentiality of content, but it doesn't provide reliable information about the actual sender of the message. In theory, someone could send you an encrypted message, but fake the sender of the email, giving you a false impression of trustworthy communication.

Because an encrypted email without digital signature is not really secure, it is highly recommended to also digitally sign emails. Thunderbird currently does not offer an option to prevent digital signing from being enabled automatically. We might consider to offer this as a default configuration in the future. At this time, if you don't want to send a digital signature, you must manually disable this option prior to sending on each encrypted email that you send.

The whole point of digitally signing a message is that the recipient will be able to verify that the digital signature is correct. To ensure that your recipients will be able to verify your signature, it is best to always include your public key. At this time, we don't provide a configuration option to automatically exclude your public key when digitally signing, rather it is necessary that you manually disable it prior to sending.

Because of limitations, we currently aren't able to automatically minimize your key. If you want to avoid that your big key is sent with each digitally signed message, you could use other software, like GnuPG, to edit and minimize your key. Ensure you have a reliable backup of your secret key. Then export your key. Use other software to minimize it.

Then delete your secret key in Thunderbird, import the minimized key, and ensure to adjust your account settings to use that key. A future version of Thunderbird may attempt to automatically minimize the key when appropriate, but this will depend on the future functionality in the RNP library. Currently, Thunderbird 78 doesn't support this feature, but we want to support it in the future.

This enhancement is tracked in Bug

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However, for private keys, you might solve the problem by configuring Thunderbird to use GnuPG , as explained in the next section. Maybe you imported the wrong key? To check that you have really imported the right key, you can do the following:. Can you find the ID that was shown above by gpg? You need to have the secret keys for at least one of the IDs that were shown by gpg.

If you do not have any matching secret key, then you cannot decrypt the message. If you do have a matching secret, but Thunderbird still fails to decrypt the message, please report a bug against Thunderbird with more details about your key. Thunderbird 78 allows you to optionally set up the external software called GnuPG for handling your secret keys for digital signing and decryption of received messages.

This will enable the use of smartcards or hardware tokens that store a secret key. You need to install and configure the required GnuPG software yourself, because it cannot be distributed together with Thunderbird. Therefore this mechanism isn't enabled by default. To learn how to use it, please refer to the next question about smartcards. Note that public keys and their acceptance settings for encryption and signature verification are always handled by Thunderbird's internal code.

Yes, we offer an optional mechanism. It requires that you install GnuPG and all required software yourself. Ensure that you have configured your personal key for your email account or identity. When you write an email, use the Options menu, or the menu found on the security button, and enable the protection you would like to use.

Technically, anyone is able to create an OpenPGP key in anyone's name, using any email address they want. Nobody is able to limit or prevent that. This means, whenever you receive a correspondent's public key, you risk that it is a false key, and an attempt to trick you. Unless you have verified your correspondent's key, you might not be having a confidential conversation, but rather you might be the victim of a Monster-In-The-Middle attack MITM. It is your decision if you care about this attack vector, and you might want to decide individually based on the correspondent.

If you accept a key, it means you are willing to use that key for sending encrypted messages to that correspondent. If you receive an email from a correspondent, your acceptance decision controls how the digital signature will be displayed. Only signatures from accepted keys will be shown as valid.

This is about a theoretical attack. Thunderbird treats personal keys differently, it grants full trust to those keys, and we skip the usual acceptance question verified, unverified, etc. In theory, an attacker might create a key in the name of one of your contacts, send the secret key to you, and trick you to import it. By requiring you to confirm that a secret key is your own key, you will probably notice that it isn't a key in your name, and you will probably reject its use as your personal key.

This stops the attack. This setting is similar to GnuPG's model of setting key as having "ownertrust ultimate". When replying, the default is to quote include the information that was in the message that you reply to. Your correspondent might have good reasons to encrypt their message, so you should be very careful when including the original text in a new message you send.

It is advisable to continue using encryption. If you are unable to encrypt, and if you consider to reply without encryption, you should probably remove all the quoted text from the email message you are writing. If your correspondent sends you an email with their public key attached, or as a regular attachment, or contained in a hidden email header according to the Autocrypt standard, then Thunderbird will offer you to import the key. You may try to discover keys online by email address, by clicking on an email address in an email message you are reading, and using the command "discover key" shown in the popup menu.

Currently, it will search for published keys using the WKD protocol, and it will search for keys in the keys. Also, the same discovery mechanism can be used when having attempted to send an encrypted email, and reviewing the missing key information. If a key has been published on the Internet, you may download the key and use OpenPGP key manager to import the downloaded file.

Or you may try to import by downloading from a given URL. Enigmail used to offer searching on non-verifying keyservers. At this time Thunderbird doesn't offer that, because of the various issues that were detected with those keyservers in the recent past. If you need to obtain a key from a keyserver that isn't currently supported by Thunderbird 78, then you must use other software to obtain it, then save it to a file, then you can use OpenPGP Key Manager to import the public key file.

At this time, Thunderbird requires the user to take control and decide when encryption should be used or not be used, by enabling the appropriate options when composing an email. For each correspondent's public key that you want or need to use, Thunderbird 78 requires that you accept the key at least once. Message encryption by itself only provides confidentiality of content, but it doesn't provide reliable information about the actual sender of the message.

In theory, someone could send you an encrypted message, but fake the sender of the email, giving you a false impression of trustworthy communication. Because an encrypted email without digital signature is not really secure, it is highly recommended to also digitally sign emails. Thunderbird currently does not offer an option to prevent digital signing from being enabled automatically. We might consider to offer this as a default configuration in the future.

At this time, if you don't want to send a digital signature, you must manually disable this option prior to sending on each encrypted email that you send. The whole point of digitally signing a message is that the recipient will be able to verify that the digital signature is correct.

To ensure that your recipients will be able to verify your signature, it is best to always include your public key. At this time, we don't provide a configuration option to automatically exclude your public key when digitally signing, rather it is necessary that you manually disable it prior to sending. Because of limitations, we currently aren't able to automatically minimize your key. If you want to avoid that your big key is sent with each digitally signed message, you could use other software, like GnuPG, to edit and minimize your key.

Ensure you have a reliable backup of your secret key. Then export your key. Use other software to minimize it. Then delete your secret key in Thunderbird, import the minimized key, and ensure to adjust your account settings to use that key. A future version of Thunderbird may attempt to automatically minimize the key when appropriate, but this will depend on the future functionality in the RNP library.

Currently, Thunderbird 78 doesn't support this feature, but we want to support it in the future. This enhancement is tracked in Bug Thunderbird will not automatically trust or accept keys that were signed by others. Also at this time, if you indicate that you have verified a correspondent's key, Thunderbird will not add your signature to it. This might change in a future version of Thunderbird. When using the Enigmail migration tool to migrate public keys to Thunderbird, it should detect keys that have already been signed by your personal key, and automatically mark the corresponding keys as accepted keys, so you don't need to start from scratch.

Find the key that you would like to export and click it to select it. Then use the window's menu bar to open the File menu, and select either "Export public key" or "Backup secret key" depending on what you require. The OpenPGP key manager also allows you to export public keys of your correspondents. Alternatively, open Account Settings for the email account of your key that you want to export and select the End-to-End Encryption pane. Next to each personal key is a little small chevron, which you can click to open key details.

Click the More button to open a list of possible actions. Select either "Export public key" or "Backup secret key". At this time, Thunderbird uses its own copy of keys, and doesn't support synchronizing keys with GnuPG.

The exception is the mechanism offered for smartcards, which could be used to use the personal keys managed by GnuPG. At the time you import your personal key into Thunderbird, we unlock it, and protect it with a different password, that is automatically randomly created. You should use the Thunderbird feature to set a Primary Password. Thunderbird does not support the Autocrypt philosophy that encryption should be fully automatic. However, Thunderbird provides limited compatibility with email clients that support Autocrypt.

Enigmail for Thunderbird 68 had offered two very different modes of operation. Note that Thunderbird is not affiliated with the pEp company. Thunderbird 78 does not provide the junior mode, the built-in OpenPGP feature that Thunderbird 78 provides is more similar to Enigmail's classic mode of operation. When starting Thunderbird 78, after Enigmail has been upgraded to version 2. If you don't want to install pEp software, you may attempt a manual migration to Thunderbird's new built-in OpenPGP feature.

To do so, you must set the configuration that disabled the previous Junior Mode. Open the Thunderbird general settings, scroll to the bottom, open Config Editor, and search for "extensions. Double click it to change it, and set the value to zero. This configuration change will cause the Enigmail migration tool to believe that you were previously using the Enigmail classic mode. On the main screen we can find the main features, the main configurations that we can make and why it is one of the best options for managing personal or company email.

This program has a large number of add-ons that allow us to have additional security, and additional functions or features of high added value. Before, we had to download a plug-in to have OpenPGP in our Thunderbird, however, with the latest versions the incorporation of OpenPGP is default, therefore, we will not have to add any additional extension. The first thing we will have to do in Mozilla Thunderbird to be able to use it is to register an email address. This email can be from Gmail, Yahoo, Microsoft Outlook, or whatever other mail server you are using.

In our case, we have configured a Gmail email account, to be able to register it, we put our name and surname, the Gmail account with its corresponding password and click on «Continue». If you have two-step authentication it will work without problems, some mail clients do not allow the use of two-step authentication because it is not supported. Once we have configured the mail, we can see in the inbox, drafts, sent emails, spam and all of our email account.

As you can see, the authentication and configuration of Gmail in Thunderbird is correct and works perfectly, now we can try to send a normal email to verify that everything is working correctly. Once we make sure that the configuration is correct, we will create the keys with OpenPGP and exchange them with the receiver, in order to send fully encrypted and authenticated emails with security. In this generate section, we can create the keys for one or more identities email addresses.

The normal thing is that these keys expire after 3 years, but we can configure more time less time. Regarding the encryption algorithm used, we can choose between RSA bits or bits and ECC, depending on which one we want to use, we will choose one or the other.

Once we have decided, we click on «Generate key» and we will get a message indicating that it may take a few minutes to create the cryptographic keys, depending on the PC we have it may take more or less time. If we right-click on the key, we can copy the public key to the clipboard, export the keys to a file, send the public key by email which we will later do , revoke the keys, delete them and see all the properties of the key.

If we have a folder with many public keys because we have used OpenPGP before, then we can import them all at once from this important menu. Finally, it is also recommended to add our public key again, in case the recipient does not have that public key. For example, we have sent an email to ourselves, and only we can decrypt it.

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